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The Latvian Blues Band (LIT) 

This is a band that knows how to make a party! You need to experience this band live ! 

 

The Latvian Blues Band was established 15 years ago, and it has gained much experienced by appearing at its Rīga base, the Bite Blues Club,[1]together with more than 200 blues artists from the United States and elsewhere.

 

Early in 2000, the Canadian blues authority Johnny V. recorded an album in Rīga. This experience opened up the road toward participation in a number of festivals (the BluesFest International Windsor and London festival, the South Country Fair in Macleod), as well as club concerts in Canada.  The LBB has appeared at the Century of Blues festival in Zagreb, Croatia (2004), as well as the Euro Jazz 2004 festivals in Athens, Greece.  

The band has appeared in Greece, Poland, Spain, and elsewhere.  

 

A particular honour was the invitation to appear at the Chicago Blues Festival in 2005 as the first European blues band ever to appear at that festival in history.  In 2008, the LBB toured a series of blues clubs in Chicago.

 

The band’s musical influences include artists such as Albert King, Freddie King, B.B. King, Albert Collins, Willie Dixon, Muddy Waters, T-Bone Walker, and many others.  The band’s original music stretches from the “second line” rhythms of New Orleans, to R’n’B and soul, and also in-depth Chicago blues.  

 

Latvian Blues Band performances are always exciting and original, with audience members being invited to take part in the concert, as well.  The band’s repertoire is very extensive, with very few pre-prepared set lists.  Each concert’s programme is based on the emotions and atmosphere of the local venue, and even if a fan attends an LBB concert every day for a week in a row, each concert will be different and, perhaps, very much in contrast to the previous one.

 

[1]   The word “Bite” in this case, refers to the Latvian word for “bee” and is pronounced (bi-teh), as opposed to the English word for chewing.